Contact Me

Email

I can be contacted using this address: stevengould@digitalnoir.com.

Or you can use the form below.

If you need to contact my publisher about signings or publicity the general contact is torpublicity@tor.com

I’ve missed too many things in the comments so I decree that email (above) is the way to go if you want to reach me.  This is not to discourage people commenting on specific posts, but if you want timely communication, commenting is not the way to go.

Press

If you are a member of the press, I am more than willing to do phone or in-person interviews but initial contact is best via email.  If you need a high-res press image of me, you can find three different portraits here and here and here.  (The first two are timed self-portraits and you may use freely.  The last one was taken by Ellen Datlow and should only be used with attribution.)

Literary Representation


I am represented by the Scovil Galen Ghosh Literary Agency, Inc.  For rights inquiries (domestic and foreign) you will find contact info (Phone, Fax, Mail, and Email) at http://www.sgglit.com/contact.htm.

45 comments

  1. Good Day! Are you planning any book signing tours near Portland (Oregon) or Seatttle (WA) any time in the next year? If not, would you sign some book plates for me? (I will send you all the materials and postage.) I want to do book plates, because the thought of the postage and weight required to send you my hardback copies fills me with fear. 🙂

    Christie

  2. I read from europa. I like your books.
    I like the character from jumpers and the full story.
    Nice compagny for me!!
    Another movie soon? jumper was good to me.

    Bye

  3. Steven,
    Are you writing any more books? I certainly hope so. I’ve read all of your books now (love them all, but the Jumper series is my favorite — I’d love to see sequels to Wildside too, and Helm). Now I’m re-reading the Jumper books, but that doesn’t make you any more $, and I want you to make lots of $ so that it’s easy for you to write more books. 🙂 Can you tell I love your writing? The movie was great too, and I very much enjoy Doug Liman’s work, but the movie didn’t capture the heart that you put into your books. I’ll definitely see all of the movies as they come out (and I hope they do!) — but I’d love more books… can you let us in on your plans?

    Tom

  4. I was wondering and i know it maybe too much 2 ask for but if it were possible for you to send me a copy of the book jumper and reflex, mine was stolen when i moved and i can’t seem to find a copy of Reflex anywhere. If possible that would be great if not then i guess i have 2 keep looking. I love ya books and the movie jumper as well. well kudos from a fan

  5. First, I’m impressed from your twitter that you play Left 4 Dead. I’m even more impressed that you played it on advanced, I shudder at the thought of the tank spawns. The thought of the author of the latest sci-fi novel I’m diving into playing such a game, I don’t know, it makes me respect you even more. Call it geek cred.

    I just started reading Jumper today after purchasing it from Borders. I’m an OSU alum and curious about why you chose Oklahoma State for Millie? Out of a hat?

    Cheers.

  6. I absolutely loved Jumper (the movie), and I just found out that, like most movies these days, it’s based off a book. But that’s awesome, because I love to read! And God knows that the books are always so much better. Whenever I pick up on my leisure reading again (which has been cut short by AP classes in high school) I’ll be sure to buy Jumper and Reflex–I can’t wait to see what happens next, and how the next movie proceeds. I hope they don’t get off the book TOO much, though, for Jumper 2, which probably should be called Reflex, since it’s such a cool name.
    I’ll be sure to let you know what I think of your books when I get around to reading them; I’m sure they’re great!

  7. I discovered your books through seeing your interview in the Making of Jumper (the Movie) extra on the movie’s DVD (I had seen it in the theater as well). I was intregued by a couple of the things you said, which have now slipped my mind, so I went to the local library and got out a couple of your books. Stunned, stunned I was at how much I have enjoyed al of the ones I have read so far. Jumper and Reflex really grabbed me, Griffin’s story also very good. I just finished Blind Waves and loved it. I have Greenwar in the car. I will look for Wildside & Helm at the Local SF store (Uncle Hugo’s) or get off amazon.

    I hope that you will continue to write novels set in both versions of the Jumper series as Reflex and Griffin’s story both left me wondering what happens next. As well as more in the Blind Waves “world” which also left me wondering how the next part of their story goes.

    Anyway, Thanks for the books so far and please write faster.

    Best regards,
    Greg

  8. I read Wildside and Jumper my senior year of high school and continued to search the shelves every year since then buying any book with your name on it. I usually finish any book you write within 4 hours. That only happens when I can’t put a book down! I re-read your books all the time, and now have most of the conversations in each memorized. (Kudos for Helm – I can relate as I have studied different styles of Martial Arts since I was 8. I’m also an Environmental Scientist with a large Utility company, so things you and your wife write are right up my alley.) I’m currently getting my masters now, and reading fun stuff is something I really should not be doing. I just wanted to say your work is an inspiration, and I can tell you have fun writing these stories. Every book is different and creative. But they are keeping me from my studies! Anyway, I wanted you to know I enjoy and appreciate your talent, and want to say keep up the good work! When this school thing is over, I may try my hand a writing too! Until then, you keep writing and i’ll keep reading! My favorites are still Jumper, Wildside, and Blind Waves – The first 3 I read.

  9. I read Wildside and Jumper my senior year of high school and continued to search the shelves every year since then buying any book with your name on it. I usually finish any book you write within 4 hours. That only happens when I can’t put a book down! I re-read your books all the time, and now have most of the conversations in each memorized. (Kudos for Helm – I can relate as I have studied different styles of Martial Arts since I was 8. I’m also an Environmental Scientist with a large Utility company, so things you and your wife write are right up my alley.) I’m currently getting my masters now, and reading fun stuff is something I really should not be doing. I just wanted to say your work is an inspiration, and I can tell you have fun writing these stories. Every book is different and creative. But they are keeping me from my studies! Anyway, I wanted you to know I enjoy and appreciate your talent, and want to say keep up the good work! When this school thing is over, I may try my hand a writing too! Until then, you keep writing and i’ll keep reading! My favorites are still Jumper, Wildside, and Blind Waves – The first 3 I read.

  10. I loved Jumper the novel, found the movie wanting for a lot. The book revolves around a tragic character, the movie revolves around a playboy. While I understand that the movie was still likely a lot of work for you, and you may be proud of it, I was really looking forward to the portrayal of David Rice as the novel was written.

    If the director or some other Hollywood writers had some influence upon you when deciding to make the movie, PLEASE do not let them do it to any of your other stories. While I would love to see HELM or WILDSIDE brought to the big screen, if they are ruined in the same manner as Jumper was, I will be very disappointed in you.

    I love your novels and the characters you create are wonderful. Please do not let Hollywood turn them into CGI monsters. Today, movies are all about the CGI and not the stories. Stay True to your own ideas as they are superior!

  11. Dear Mr. Gould,
    I am writing a report on your history for my English class. I am in the 9th grade at Elizabethton High School. Our class was asked to read some of our favorite authors and then follow up with a research paper. Well, I have done my research but I cannot seem to find enough of your personal information. I can write merely on your professional work but I’m afraid that wasn’t exactly the point of the assignment. And it’s not like I can jump to your house and conduct an interview. I would be overjoyed if you might kindly email me anything that you find interesting about yourself. Helpful things might be where you went to school and college, the year you graduated, family life, an dyour inspiration for your writing career and books. Thank you for your time and attention.
    Kalee Holdren

    P.S. I’ve read your books in the Jumper series and they were the reason I chose you. My partner and I love your writing. I will definetely read any new books you come out with.

  12. Hello, Mr. Gould,
    First and foremost, I love your books, Jumper and Reflex. I’ve read both of them twice, and now I have my girlfriend hooked, as well. The main reason we love the story is because you’ve written the character, David, as an ordinary boy with weaknesses and insecurities, not as some James Bond persona no one can relate to. Since his reaction to an unusual gift is genuine fear, disbelief, and ultimately acceptance, I can easily see myself in those situations responding the exact same way. The same can not be said of characters written by other Fiction writers. Please keep up the good work and I hope the saga continues with a follow-up to Reflex.

    I do have a question for you. When the screenplay for the film, Jumper, was written, did Liman ask for your permission to go off on a completely different direction with your story and characters? The movie had but a few similarities to your book, and I was wondering if that was done with your approval. Or if not, did that really piss you off? I imagine you have mixed feelings; resentment over the complete altering of your story, and gratitude that the movie caused readers (like me) to become suddenly aware of your work.

    Anyway, I love your imagination. Keep up the good work.
    Warren W.
    Gilbert, Arizona

  13. Mr Gould,

    I read your book for the first time when I was in college in 1994. I absolutely loved it! It was one of a very short list of books that I wished would be made into a movie. I never knew you wrote a sequel, and now will have to find a copy of it.

    Thanks again!

  14. I read Jumper when it first came out and was hooked. I read a lot and have probably read every major Sci Fi writer. What a refreshing change your books are! I must have read Jumper 5 times by now. Same for wildside. Have read them all. I love the approach, just straight ahead stories that can’t be put down. Just finished Griffin’s Story. A little dark for my taste. Seemed like you had already got us choked up enough when the parents were killed. Wasn’t sure why Sam and Consuelo needed to die too. In any event, another fun quick read. Several of my kids love jumper and wildside too. When Jumper came out we made a family event out of it.
    Would love for you to continue the Jumper series. Be nice to follow him as he grows up. Davie’s kids, wife, how they work as a team to thwart the paladins, government baddies, etc.

    Good work, keep it up. Steve

  15. Thank you for responding to all your fans’ comments/questions (mine included) regarding your novel vs. the movie. You confirmed all of my suspicions and assumptions.

    I’m so happy you’re planning on writing a third David Rice book. My girlfriend and I have enjoyed the Jumper and Reflex novels because you’ve created a main character with whom we can relate on an emotional level. When I read what David says and does, I can easily see myself reacting the exact same way. In the most basic sense, I care what happens to David because it’s as if I’m reading about myself. When you give David the gift of jumping, it’s as if you’ve given me the gift of jumping. When I was younger, I used to have these vivid dreams where I had the ability to fly. They seemed so real that one time I climbed up on my bed (while still half asleep) and leapt across my room thinking I’d spend the evening flying over my neighborhood. It was like doing a belly flop in an empty pool. I should be grateful I didn’t smack my head on the edge of my writing desk. Even though it was all imagined, I’ve never forgotten the thrill of flying. Reading your books and imagining myself jumping and “twinning”, I get back a little of that thrill.

    I just finished Wildside, and really enjoyed the second half. It had a similar theme to Jumper and Reflex; government and/or military trying to gain control over underdog’s otherworldly gift. Unfortunately, characters’ reactions/responses to their numerous challenges/obstacles seemed emotionally controlled and beyond their years. These kids are fresh out of high school. Realistically, their biggest concern would be finding and keeping a part-time job while maintaining at least a 3.0 at a community college. Unlike David Rice, the characters in Wildside were difficult to relate to and I found myself unconcerned for their well-being. Also, all the technical information about planes and flying was overwhelming and seemed a bit irrelevant. Clearly, you did your aviation research, but more than a few times I found my eyes glazing over the words.

    In response to your inquiry regarding a suitable name for your next novel, my first thought was of “Swarm”. Unfortunately, Michael Crichton already used that title for a novel about nano-robots attempting to end mankind. Hmmmm… that sounds strangely familiar.

  16. I completely forgot to ask you my question in my previous comment. Given my hankering for fiction novels about realistic characters who accomplish amazing things, can you recommend any books for me to read while I’m waiting for your new ones? A couple examples of books I’ve already read would be the Odd Thomas books by Dean Koontz, and Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk. To give you a better understanding of how my brain is wired, I’ll give you another example from my dream world. Ever since I can remember I’ve had this fantasy of being able to freeze time at will to enjoy the blissful silence of the still planet doing whatever I want for as long as I want. I picture myself parking a U-Haul rental truck at the entrance to each casino in Las Vegas. Then sifting through the gambling tables stacking full boxes of cash on a dolly. Loading up the truck and driving back home where I fill up a guest bedroom with what I call my “retirement fund”. Finally, I restart time and act all surprised when the big story on all the news stations is of a massive casino heist in Sin City.
    Anyway, if you have any recommendations for fiction novels that would cater to my twisted mind, I surely would appreciate it.
    Thank you, sir.
    Warren

  17. Hi. I just read Jumper Griffin’s Story. I really enjoyed it. I have previously read most of your other books and enjoyed them all. But I was disappointed in the movie Jumper. It must be hard to see someone adapt your work to film and do it so poorly. As such I was impressed with the way you took their less interesting storyline and made a great book out of it with Griffin’s story. Great job, it proves what a talented author you are.
    Looking forward to more great books.
    Doug H.
    P.S. I discovered your work from the rave reviews Cory Doctorow gave Reflex on Boing Boing.

  18. Hll dr Sr.

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    Yrs trly,
    Sn

    [Where are the vowels?]
    Sean's comment has been deemed trollish and has had the vowels removed.
  19. Hw cn nyn njy Stvn Gld’s bks? Th plts n’t tht bd, bt th stry-tllng s trrbly brng. Mr thn nc w s hs chrctrs cght n mndn ctvts whch Mr. Gld thnks ncssry t dscrb, lk fr nstnc th nnrvng mmnts Dvy spnds n hs prsn-rm (n “Rflx”) dng rdnry stff. Smhw, t ws bvs tht ftr pkng th frst tm hs thrt wll b tchy nd sr, nd h’ll hv bd tm tng. Nnthlss, t ndd t b dscrbd (fr th sk f t). Bt r-tllng th sm thng ftr hs scnd hrd-vmt xprnc, nd lmst wth th xct wrds… Mr. Gld, hw mch r thy pyng y fr vry nncssry wrd y wrt? D th ‘fllrs’ py th sm? mn, ndrstnd tht y wnt t vst th Ntnl Gllry n Wshngtn, bt d y hv t mntn VRY strt th chrctrs pss, nm nd ggrphcl pstn? Mr. Gld, lk yr ds bt thnk y shld knw whn y’r wstng ppl’s tm.
    Lv, Grg.

    [Where are the vowels?]
    greg's comment has been deemed trollish and has had the vowels removed.
  20. I’ve removed Greg’s vowel’s. He’s welcome to express criticism of my novels in his own venue, but not mine. I strongly suggest he not read my books as he is clearly not my audience.

  21. s, nly ss-kssng hr?

    [Where are the vowels?]
    noam chomsky's comment has been deemed trollish and has had the vowels removed.
  22. tht’s rlly nc Mr. Gld, cnsrshp n th Hm f th Fr, th Lnd f th Brv, tc. Bt y msjdg m. s ’v sd bfr, ’m fnd f th “Jmpr” trlgy. Fr xmpl, hppn t lk yr rfrnc t Thng n nd Thng Tw frm Dr. Sss’s “Th Ct n th Ht”. ls, thr my b smthng f Nrs Rtchd nd Mss Mnchn ltgthr n Dvy’s trmntr. t my nt vn b yr flt tht sm lttl mstks hv bn lft n th bk,… prbbly th dtrs r t blm. Bt y s, t’s hrd fr m t ndrstnd hw wmn wh jst brfly stck hr hd thrgh th dr cn “g bck tsd” s f sh wr ctlly nsd. nd ths s jst n prgrph blw.
    Yrs trly,
    Grg

    [Where are the vowels?]
    greg's comment has been deemed trollish and has had the vowels removed.
  23. Three words I would describe that person who critized Steve so foolishly, yet I cannot say them here as that would be rude.

    I’d also stup up to that guy’s level.

    I makes me feel bad to see someone do that, especially when they act like Steve has no life except for writing.

    Steve indeed has a life, and he can write that book any time he wants.

  24. Steve,
    You rock. I was introduced to you thru Cory Doctorow, e-literally. Thank you for your support of the troops. Hntng Prts (Rrrrrggg). Being away from home gave me a good opportunity to devour some novels, from Cory, and you… Very enjoyable. For those who criticized your pacing, all I can believe is that their addiction to Hollywoodization has addled their attention span. Thank you for the Zps, and I’m serious about the Tshirt, by the way, just wait for Cory to tell you he got his.

  25. Dear Steve

    Yesterday I finished reading “Reflex”. It was great.
    Only now do I realize how nostalgic it made me feel. And excited!
    Under this impression, i can’t wait to get a hold of Griffin’s Story.

    Surely, people criticizing you here are out of their minds.
    Until now I’ve only heard good things about you, and probably true.
    Can those people who bring your novels into question write a book?
    Kant once said: “The true reason for criticizing lies in one’s incapability to adjust his system of values to an alternate way of thought”. I believe he was right. Keep on writing!

  26. Hello! I, as most on here, love your books and feel like an addict with a limited supply of his vice. Is there a proposed release date for the sequel to Reflex?

    Thank you so very much for your dedication!

    Jason Buck

  27. Dear Mr. Gould,

    I love your books, but sometimes i can’t really understand some things (I’m not native English). Yesterday i just read this sentence from Reflex: ” Her cell phone was also there and he could hardly call her that way if she didn’t have it” and I’ve pondered upon its meaning. In my language, we call this “redundancy” and usually refrain from such deviations, but I was curious what role the last part of the sentence plays. It might be that it has a different value in English.

    Thanks,
    Keep on writing

  28. Richard,
    I would parse that sentence something like this:

    Her cell phone was also [in that previous place] and he could hardly call her [using the cell phone, since she didn’t have it where she was now.]

    There is definitely redundancy but that’s not always a bad thing.
    However, I think that it is pretty awkward sentence and if I were writing it today (10 years later) I would modify it.

    Thanks for the kind words.

    Steve

  29. Mr. Gould,
    I would like to offer my most sincere apologies for the comment I made back on August 2nd of last year. I honestly don’t know why I had the audacity to critique the work of someone of whom I am a huge fan. I’m not justifying my actions by saying this, but I believe after reading two of my favorite books of all time (Jumper & Reflex), I placed you on such a high pedestal. Then after reading Wildside, I actually had the gall to tell you my opinions AS IF THEY REALLY MATTERED! I am an artist, myself, and although my medium is not the written word I would be just as offended if a complete stranger came up and criticized my artwork. It was a moment of immaturity on my part and I hope you can forgive my ignorance.
    If you are, in fact, able to forgive me, then when you have a spare moment could you respond to the question I asked you on August 3rd regarding other fiction novels you would recommend?
    Respectfully yours,
    Warren
    p.s. As I mentioned above, I am an artist. When I’m not at my day job, I paint abstract portraits. Examples of my work can be found on my website, woodsonportraits.com. As a token of my appreciation for your talent, I would like to offer my services to you free of charge. If you’re interested, please do not hesitate to contact me. Thank you again.

  30. Dear Mr. Gould,

    I have a few questions/suggestions regarding the thirteenth chapter of ‘Reflex’, especially the scene when Millie is with the handicapped kid. Your editors seem to have failed you. (I’m referring to the TOR edition, don’t know it there are others).
    First of all, a meaningless sentence: “Maybe you feel ungrateful, sometimes, despite all the stuff you have you have done for you.”
    Secondly, Maggie becomes Angie for two paragraphs: “Angie eyed her”… “Angie’s mother”
    I spotted these and thought that it would be fair to tell you. Might help in the future.
    Now, I know that character development is important, but I already knew to this point that Millie was a good person, kind and gentle, yet unyielding… so to me, the “I wish i had a kid like you (even if he was paralyzed)” thing was a bit too much. I understand that it is imperative for the reader to be aware of Millie’s maternal intentions, but this is just pushing it. I think the scene is a little bit too dramatic and thus partially steals the suspense from the main plot (which is Millie hunting down some BAddies.) It is just a personal opinion, and you probably had your own reasons for including it.

    Sincerly yours,
    R.

  31. Howdy –

    I’d love to get your books as Ebooks, but for some reason, they aren’t available. Can you advise the status of releasing them in Kindle / Ebook / or some other format? I’ve lost my copies of the books, and it’s coming up on time to re-read Helm & Wildside. If they aren’t released soon I may have to find used copies (bleh). I reread the Jumper Trifecta when I purchased them as a gift for a co-worker nearly 2 years ago now, so really, I need to re-read them as well. So… Since I’m gonna spend money anyway, I’d rather support you while doing it. Really want to re-read these soon…

  32. Thanks for the kind words, Giles.

    Some time in the next six months I will be releasing e-editions of my first four (if not five) novels.

    Hopefully they will be available through all the major venues: kindle, ibooks, b&n, as well as through a non-drm source.

  33. Mister Gould,
    It’s hard to believe that it be almost a full yeer since I begun serving my time, and I have you to thank. I come across your book Helm at our prison library and read it in only five days. I aint got nothing else to do so I read it again and again. I read your book 47 times. I asked my mama if she go get me some a your other books but she said no. So I asked the warden if he get more of your books for his library and he said no. So as a last resort I asked this guy Reggie if he could get his hands on your books and give them to me and he said aint nothing in this life ever for free. So I had to do some things with him that I promised myself I would never do again but man oh man it was worth the pain. He was a man of his word. He got me Jumper and Wildside and I love them so much! I sleep with Jumper under my pillow and dream about being David. I dreamed about getting out of this prison cell just by thinking about it. I dreamed about grabbing the Warden and dropping him off the side of buildin. I dreamed about Reggie and all the things Id do to him. You become an insperation to me. When I think about your stories time flyes by reel fast. Like I said I been locked up for a year but it don’t even seem that long cause I got David to keep me company. I promise when I get out a here I’m gonna find you so I can thank you proper. Until then if you ever in Arizona I would really like it if you come pay me a visit.
    Sincerly,
    Randy Stephens
    Inmate #57767
    Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections
    Phoenix, Arizona

  34. Hey, sorry for my english cos i’m french. I writting a book and if you want, you steven gould, i’d like your help for my book, i can enjoy the begin of my book for you tell me what i must change or what i must say more. i love your book, Jumper, Reflex, Wild Side. please write an answer.

  35. Thank you to give me this website, it was a honnor to talk with you. I tell you. for me the best story for Jumper it’s the book cos you are a very great writer, and if you can’t read the begin of the book, it’s not so wrong for me because now i want really write this story.
    Bye, and good continuation.

  36. Steve,
    I just wanted to say how much of a fan I am of your Jumper series. I’ve probably re-read Jumper at least 5 times. You are without a doubt one of my favorite authors. I hope I’ll get to read some of the new Jumper book in the near future.

    Ciao
    Sara

  37. Dear Mr. Gould,

    I’d heard of the movie “Jumper,” but was fortunate — in retrospect — to have found and read the novel first, a couple months ago. I followed with “Reflex,” then “Jumper: Griffin’s Story,” all of which I thoroughly enjoyed. Your writing sparkles, and the way you handle narrative is such a treat.

    I couldn’t help but be disappointed when I saw your work given the Hollywood treatment. I know books are rarely improved in adaptation and are, to a large part, internal, while movies are stories told with pictures. There were many fine moments to be savored in the film, but the pictures you created in my head with your words on the page were far more fun than the ones I saw on the screen. (Now, isn’t that just what kids said about Harry Potter?) Still, movies build readership and grow your audience. And after all, having heard of the film made me look into “Jumper” in the first place.

    Thanks for taking readers like me along for a wild ride. I hope we hear more about David Rice in the near future.

    Best to you and yours.

  38. I just read “Shade” and it left me wanting more! Jumper took me back to my childhood and reflex to my college days. Shade whetted my appetite for more of Millie and David. Mr. Gould, please continue the series! Your fans are waiting!

  39. Hi Mr. Gould:
    My name is Nicolas Gould, in my country are a family just this name, so I have curiosity and also I know I have only 14 years’m just a kid but I have high expectations for the future would be happy if I gave your e-mail.
    Greetings
    Nicolas Gould

  40. Hi Mr. Gould:
    My name is Nicolas Gould, in my country are a family just this name, so I have curiosity and also I know I have only 14 years’m just a kid but I have high expectations for the future would be happy if I gave your e-mail.
    if only you are interested in what you send send me an email reply, this is my e-mail nico.gould @ hotmail.com
    Greetings
    Nicolas Gould

  41. Hello Mr Gould,

    I just finished reading Reflex and was curious about the next book. Glad to see your site was published in the book so now I know something more is planned. Looking forward to your future works, will be buying up your other series also. Keep up the good writing and thank you so much for writing such good stories!

Comments are closed.